Contact Information

Computer Science Department
Colgate University
McGregory Hall, 3rd Floor
13 Oak Drive
Hamilton, NY 13346
(tel) 315.228.7719
Charlotte Jablonski, Administrative Assistant
cjablonski@colgate.edu

Upcoming events

  • 26

    Sep

    2017

    Speakers: Jack Lin '18 and Ryan Yu '18

    Abstract: Multiple past studies has shown that motor imagery of the opening and closing of the hand can be effectively categorized with high accuracy using laboratory grade BCI systems. In our study we sought out to determine if a relatively affordable BCI setup can also classify the same sets of motor imagery with acceptable accuracy rates. To accomplish this, we first implemented our own BCI system in Java using an OpenBCI EEG headset as the signal acquisition device and a 3D printed robotic arm as the feedback interface. With our system in place, we ran multiple trials to record separate EEG data associated with the motor imagery of the closing and opening of the right hand. Using the LIBSVM package, we were able to train a set of models based on the pre-recorded trials which we then used to tests against random sample data to determine classification accuracy. By testing subsets of pre-recorded trial data on the model, we received prediction accuracy of over 80%.

  • 3

    Oct

    2017

    Speakers: James Reed, Career Services

    Getting an internship, full-time job, or admission or graduate school can seem like a daunting task. We'll cover what steps you should take to find and apply for jobs, internships, and graduate programs in tech. We'll also highlight some of the resources career services offers to help with your search.

  • 17

    Oct

    2017

    Speaker: Rohan Chaudhari '19


Past events

  • 19

    Sep

    2017

    Speaker: Prof. Darren Strash

    Abstract: In this talk, I will discuss my recent research on visibility graph reconstruction: the problem of constructing a polygon that has a given visibility graph. This is a fundamental problem with unknown complexity, although visibility graph recognition (the problem of recognizing if a graph is a visibility graph of some polygon) is known to be in PSPACE.

    I show that two classes of uniform step length polygons can be reconstructed efficiently by finding and removing rectangles formed between consecutive convex boundary vertices, called tabs. This technique gives a O(n^2m)-time reconstruction algorithm for orthogonally convex polygons, where n and m are the number of vertices and edges in the visibility graph, respectively. I also show that reconstructing a monotone chain of staircases (called a histogram) is fixed-parameter tractable, when parameterized on the number of tabs, and polynomially solvable in time O(n^2m) under reasonable alignment restrictions.

    This is joint work with Nodari Sitchinava; to be presented at the 25th Symposium on Graph Drawing and Network Visualization.

  • 12

    Sep

    2017

    Sharpen your coding and problem solving skills in our mini programming challenge! We'll work in teams to solve a few problems from recent programming competitions. Prof. Strash will also discuss how you can participate in the ACM Programming Contest.

    As always, a light lunch will be provided.

  • 31

    Aug

    2017

    Since Thursday is following a Tuesday schedule, we'll be having pizza to welcome you back!

  • 25

    Apr

    2017

    Speakers: Drew Zhong and Carlton Yang
    Drew's Abstract:
    Engineering a fast branch-and-reduce algorithm for the minimum vertex cover problem
    I developed three new techniques to improve a state-of-the-art branch-and-reduce algorithm (by Akiba and Iwata, 2016) for computing an exact minimum vertex cover in larger networks such as social networks and web-crawl graphs in exact time. First, I show that we can change the order to apply slow yet critical reduction rules in a more targeted way. Second, I am able to feed the algorithm with a high-quality solution to avoid many branching calls. Third, I store solutions to subproblems to avoid repeated computations. My experiments have successfully improved the running time of this algorithm for many real-life networks, for which the existing algorithms take long time to find a solution.

    Carlton's Abstract:
    GPU Acceleration on Large Computational Models
    Studies in regulatory biological networks often rely on mathematical modeling and computer simulations on various scales and levels of complexity. Various packages are created to provide simulation and analysis on such models, yet currently available packages do not fully meet the requirements of researchers. My research focuses on creating a software that is efficient, easily updatable and user friendly to researchers without substantial programming skills.

  • 18

    Apr

    2017

    Bria Vicenti will be giving an overview of her honor’s thesis titled "Developing a Concussion Tracking Application for the Modern Student-Athlete”. She will give an overview of the user-centered design process which she utilized to design a mobile application for the Colgate Club Sports program in the hope of improving concussion self-reporting behaviors in student athletes.

  • 11

    Apr

    2017

    Speaker: Gaurav Ragtah '13, Yelp

    Abstract: An intro to how biases creep into machine learning, and why we should be cautious. Followed by tech industry insights -- what CS looks like in school vs startups vs big companies, some unintuitive keys to success, thoughts on grad school, and what product management is.

    Bio: Gaurav Ragtah is a product manager at Yelp, and has previously led mission-critical projects at Google Nest, Lithium Klout, and LinkedIn SlideShare. He did his undergrad at Colgate (Computer Science '13), and recently finished his Master's at Columbia, focused on Machine Learning and Natural Language Processing. Gaurav loves working on AI side projects, enjoys reading up on sociology and linguistics, speaks four languages natively, and occasionally performs south asian fusion music.

  • 4

    Apr

    2017

    Speaker: Dr. Nick Webb, Union College

    Abstract: We envision a future in which robots mingle with humans in city squares, train stations, malls, or popular meeting spots on college campuses. These robots will perform a variety of tasks such as cleaning, leading guided tours, delivering items or providing help and information. Such robots will need varying degrees of help performing their tasks, and that help could be supplied by anyone in the immediate vicinity of the robot. These robots will need to approach nearby people for help. These people may not be accustomed to interacting with robots and will be unprimed, that is they may not be expecting an approach from a robot, or expect to come into contact with a robot at all. Approaching a person for help involves three main subtasks: selecting who to ask, approaching that person, and initiating the interaction with verbal and non-verbal communicative behaviors. In this talk, the steps to establishing a research program in these areas will be described, and the challenges of working with real robot platforms will be explored.

    Bio: Dr. Nick Webb is Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science at Union College. His research encompasses a range of Natural Language Processing applications, including Information Extraction, Question Answering and Dialogue Systems, as well as Social Robotics, and Computer Science Education. He was the Principal Investigator of the NSF-funded Social Robotics Consortium of the Capital Region, and is co-PI of the Social Robotics Workshop, funded by the National Center for Women and Information Technology (NCWIT) and Google IgniteCS. He is not a roboticist.

  • 28

    Mar

    2017

    Professors Sommers and Strash will give a brief overview of the electives they are teaching in Fall 2017: Software Engineering for the Cloud and Advanced Algorithms, respectively.

  • 21

    Mar

    2017

    Speaker: Tom Brackett, Professor Emeritus of Computer Science, Colgate University

    Abstract: A look at the case to be made that John Vincent Atanasoff, born in Hamilton, NY in 1903, was indeed the inventor of the digital computer.

    Bio: Tom Brackett is a Professor Emeritus of Computer Science at Colgate. He founded Colgate's Computer Science department in 1971 and was the Director of Computing at Colgate from 1970 to 1975. Before founding the CS department, Tom was a professor in the Chemistry departments at Colgate (1963 to 1971) and Rice University (1957 to 1962). Tom, along with his spouse Elizabeth Brackett, have worked extensively to support the education of Burmese refugees. They founded the Brackett Refugee Education Fund in 1997 and were awarded a Doctor of Humane Letters Honoris Causa by Colgate in 2015.

  • 7

    Mar

    2017

    Speaker: Madeline E. Smith
    Abstract:
    Computing technologies have become increasingly embedded into modern life. Tools such as smartphones have become so ubiquitous that it is hard for us to imagine life without them. Undoubtedly such technologies have have significant impact on people’s lives, both positive and negative. Smartphones with built-in GPS functionality allow us to navigate through places we are unfamiliar without ever getting lots. People have also blindly followed those same GPS directions off of cliffs and into lakes, leading to severe injuries and even deaths [1,2].

    During this tea we will use this and several other examples to discuss questions such as: As computer scientists who work on designing and building these tools and the technologies that make them possible, how can we consider the social impact of our work? How do our own personal values become embedded into our code? What are our ethical and moral responsibilities?

    [1] https://www.cnet.com/news/womans-gps-leads-her-straight-into-a-100-ft-deep-lake/
    [2] https://www.cnet.com/news/man-followed-gps-drove-off-disused-bridge-ramp-wife-dies-police-say/

  • 28

    Feb

    2017

    Speakers: Ryan Diew and Cristian Saguil

    Abstract: Colgate's Through into Action (TIA) program helps budding entrepreneurs turn their ideas into successful ventures. Ryan, founder of Trippie, and Cristian, founder of Pigeon, will speak about their ventures and the technical challenges they're trying to solve.

    Finding what you want in the airport doesn't have to be such a hassle anymore. Trippie takes the turbulence out of navigating airports.

    Pigeon Ridesharing is a long-distance ride matching service that places college students together in carpools based on their destinations. Currently, we operate at Colgate University, helping students find transportation home for major breaks and holidays.

  • 21

    Feb

    2017

    Speaker: Christopher King, Class Of 2018

    Abstract: ​​
    Even after decades of vision research, interaction between user and computer hasn't been perfected. But a wave is simple, but that has difficulties in itself. My research aims to understand the difficulty of this problem and develop an environment to test any hypotheses I develop with my mentor, Elodie Fourquet, such as applying known body proportions to intuitively understand the body.
    Using the temporal and spatial coherences in mapping body proportions as specified by Vitruvius, we found that if the human body can be found within certain parameters, not only can we track it, but we can predict where the body went when its out of focus and categorize anyone in frame based on how they vary from the Vitruvian body ratio. Our implementation detects extrema from a moving silhouette based on skin color and motion, and gathers relevant information to build a personal model given the silhouettes in frame.

  • 14

    Feb

    2017

    Speaker: Lena Olson, Google

    Abstract: Specialized hardware accelerators, including third-party accelerators, can offer system designers high performance and/or low energy. They are increasingly complex and have interesting new abilities, such as sharing a unified memory space with the host system. However, accelerators may contain security vulnerabilities due to design flaws or malicious intent. I will give an overview of some types of threats that may be especially important when considering accelerators. I will then talk about a low-overhead approach to mitigating one particular flaw: incorrect memory accesses to host system memory by the accelerator. We show how accelerators can be forced to respect process memory access permissions as stored in the page table, with a per-accelerator storage overhead of 0.006% the size of physical memory and low (on average, 0.15%) performance overheads.

    Bio: Lena Olson received her PhD in Computer Sciences from University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2016. She was advised by Mark Hill. Her dissertation focused on the security and reliability challenges of hardware accelerators, in particular how third-party accelerators can coherently access shared memory while still maintaining safety and security on the host system. Her other research interests included various ways of improving energy efficiency in CPU caches through predicting block reuse behavior. Lena works in Google's Madison office.

  • 7

    Feb

    2017

    Speaker: Aaron Gember-Jacobson

    Abstract: Our brains receive 11 million bits of information every second, but we can only consciously process 40 bits per second. Thus, the majority of our mental processing is ruled by our unconscious. These unconscious decisions are influenced by our own biases, which can lead us to make decisions that negatively impact our peers, our university, the computer science community, and society.

    Aaron will engage students and faculty in exercises that illustrate unconscious bias, present some of the leading research on unconscious bias, and discuss strategies that are used by some of the leading companies in technology to overcome unconscious bias.

  • 31

    Jan

    2017

    Can we mine personal data while protecting privacy? Can a computer put back together a pile of marble fragments? Can we replace network operators with computer programs? 2D or not 3D?

    These are just some of the research questions that CS professors will be exploring with students this summer. Come hear about some of the exciting projects you can be involved in as part of Colgate's undergraduate summer research program.

    More information about the program and projects is available at: http://www.colgate.edu/summer

  • 24

    Jan

    2017

    Join CS faculty and students to celebrate the beginning of the spring semester. Come enjoy pizza and conversation!

  • 29

    Nov

    2016

    Our very own Michael Chavinda will give a talk about open-source contributions. As usual, lunch will be served.

  • 15

    Nov

    2016

    Google software engineers (and Colgate alums!) will guide you through a year-by-year walkthrough of how to best prepare yourself to work in the tech industry. We'll be dialing in over Hangouts to share this intel with only those who can make it to the event -- full details are below. We will have food and swag available while they last, too!

    RSVP for the event here: http://goo.gl/ECRMj6. If you’re interested in internships or full-time opportunities with us next summer make sure to include a soft copy of your resume in your registration.

  • 8

    Nov

    2016

    Come watch the election day news feed over lunch. Faculty members will be on hand to answer questions about course registration.

  • 1

    Nov

    2016

    Professors Gember-Jacobson and Hay will give an overview of their 400-level courses being offered in Spring 2017, and the department will review its other course offerings. Faculty will be on-hand to answer questions about course registration and for other advising.

  • 25

    Oct

    2016

    Maria Zhang, Vice President of Engineering at Tinder, speaks about mobile app development and the evolving mobile presence of Tinder. This event is in cooperation with Career Services and Institutional Advancement.

    Bio: As Vice President of Engineering, Maria Zhang leads development efforts at Tinder, building and scaling the app for its global user base, assembling and guiding a world-class team of engineers and challenging everyone to create software instilled with purpose. Prior to joining Tinder, Maria served as Vice President of Engineering at Yahoo Mobile, garnering the highly coveted Apple Design Award and shipping major product releases, including: Yahoo, Yahoo News Digest, Yahoo Sports and Yahoo Fantasy Sports. Prior to Yahoo, Maria founded Alike, a mobile local recommendation app later acquired by Yahoo. Maria’s previous positions include Principal Software Development Manager at Microsoft, Product Team Lead at Zillow.com, and Senior Software Engineer at NetIQ Corp. Maria received a Masters in Computer Science and a B.A. in Computer Science, Mathematics and Economics from Eastern Michigan University after transferring from Tsinghua University in Beijing. She currently resides in Palo Alto, California.

  • 18

    Oct

    2016

    Speaker: Sandra Jackson

    Abstract: The idea of asynchronous circuits is actually not a new one, but for a long time, synchronous circuit design has been the accepted design method. However, due to current challenges that come along with synchronous design, as well as certain projects that asynchronous circuits are particularly suited for, asynchronous circuits have reemerged as a necessary design consideration. Research has developed two basic schools of thought on how these asynchronous circuits should be implemented. Quasi-delay insensitive (QDI) asynchronous circuits make use of completion trees in order to control data flow. Bundled data (BD) asynchronous circuits exploit known delays to control data flow. Both of these methods have been used in high-profile emerging technologies which are highlighting the benefits of asynchronous circuits and paving the way for increased use of this design method.

    Bio: Sandra Jackson received her Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Cornell University in 2014. While at Cornell she was a member of the Asynchronous VLSI and Architecture Lab. More recently, she attended the IEEE conference on Asynchronous Circuits and Systems to present research related to her thesis on Gradual Synchronization. Her research interests currently include asynchronous circuits, synchronization, neuromorphic computing, and genetic algorithms.

  • 4

    Oct

    2016

    Join us for a discussion with Carol Drogus to review different types of opportunities for off-campus study, including the processes to apply to them, and to hear from students who have participated in Colgate study groups and approved programs.

  • 20

    Sep

    2016

    Put your coding and problem solving skills to the test and join us for a mini programming challenge. We'll work in teams to solve a problem from a recent ACM Program Competition. We'll have laptops on hand, or you can use your own, to write and test your solution. There may even be a special treat for teams that successfully solve the problem.

    Organized by Prof. Gember-Jacobson. Lunch will be served.

  • 14

    May

    2016

    The CS and Math departments jointly welcome graduating seniors and their families for a commencement weekend reception with faculty and staff.

  • 29

    Apr

    2016

    The Consortium for Computing Sciences in Colleges — Northeastern Region conference includes a programming contest and career fair. Students are encouraged to participate; contact Char Jablonski or Vijay Ramachandran for more information. See: http://ccscne.org/conferences/ccscne-2016/

  • 26

    Apr

    2016

    Join us for our end-of-semester party, including a chance to recognize our graduating seniors. Note that the department event will only start at 12:30pm, after the University's award convocation that takes place at 11:30am.

  • 19

    Apr

    2016

    Students working with Prof. Stratton will describe their independent-study projects from this semester. Lunch will be served.

  • 12

    Apr

    2016

    Speaker: Prof. John Stratton

    Abstract: Towards the end of the 20th century, digital computing was dominated by the general purpose processor. Economies of scale meant that a well-rounded CPU that could do just about anything was cheaper and more efficient than a processor built for a specific task in many scenarios. However, in today's power-constrained and battery-driven systems, the inefficiencies of traditional CPU architectures are too big to ignore. Workloads like 3D graphics rendering and media streaming take large enough amount of computational power that it is worth adding special hardware specifically for those tasks. Special hardware requires special software to use effectively, so we will spend some time looking at how hardware and software have adapted together in the pursuit of efficiency.

    Lunch will be served.

  • 8

    Apr

    2016

    Students present their work at a poster session at the 4th NYCWiC. Profs. Cucura and Fourquet attend as well. For more information, see: http://nycwic.acm.org

  • 5

    Apr

    2016

    CS faculty will be available to answer last-minute questions about course registration. Lunch will be served.

  • 29

    Mar

    2016

    Prof. Ramachandran presents some example programming-challenge problems and leads a discussion about techniques to solve them. These exercises are a great way to review some material from algorithms & data structures.

  • 22

    Mar

    2016

    Tor is a system for anonymous communication that has millions of users around the world. We will start with an overview of this real-world system including both how it works and known attacks on this system. We will then discuss ways in which beliefs about trust might be used to improve Tor’s security. As part of this, we will describe a modular system that allows users to capture such beliefs using probability distributions on sets of network elements that might be observed by an attacker. We will illustrate this system through the study of two novel types of attackers. This is based on joint work with Aaron Johnson, Sarah Cortes, Paul Syverson, and Joan Feigenbaum.

    Aaron Jaggard is a researcher in the Formal Methods Section of the Center for High Assurance Computer Systems at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory. He was previously a visiting assistant professor of computer science at Colgate, an assistant research professor at the DIMACS center at Rutgers, and a VIGRE postdoctoral fellow in mathematics at Tulane. His research involves the development and use of models to reason about the trustworthiness and security of systems. This includes work on accountability and identifiability, dynamics of game-theoretic systems, anonymous communication, and formal-methods analysis of protocols.

  • 8

    Mar

    2016

    Join us for a casual get-together over lunch to welcome our newly declared majors! Professors will also be available for informal advising.

  • 1

    Mar

    2016

    Sonia Chiasson, Canada Research Chair in Human Oriented Computer Security at Carleton University in Ottawa will give a remote presentation about her research for this department tea.

    Abstract: There is a prevailing belief that users are the weakest link the security chain. I will discuss how this perspective is inherently counterproductive to achieving increased cyber security and explore alternatives with a higher chance of improving security. Why do users behave insecurely even though most will readily state that security and privacy are important to them? This talk will cover some of our most recent research exploring reasons why users' actions do not necessarily reflect their desire for security. I will discuss our work using eye-tracking to determine how users make phishing determinations, and how we can persuade users to behave more securely through improving their mental models of passwords and by making adjustments to the system configurations.

  • 23

    Feb

    2016

    Michael Chavinda '17 will give an introduction to (functional) reactive programming.

    Modern applications are inherently concurrent, but concurrent code is quite difficult to write and scale. This talk will focus on what is becoming an increasingly popular solution to writing scalable and data driven code - functional reactive programming.

    For an introduction to reactive programming, see https://gist.github.com/staltz/868e7e9bc2a7b8c1f754.

    Lunch will be served.

  • 16

    Feb

    2016

    This department tea will feature a remote presentation by Barath Raghavan, a researcher at the International Computer Science Institute (Berkeley, CA).

    Abstract: Money drives political campaigns today, and weakens our democracy. Candidates with big donors or deep pockets dominate the political landscape. Some existing campaigns have recognized the value of political volunteers, but rarely are their skills harnessed effectively. We're building technology to tame the chaos of grassroots campaigns, enabling candidates (and issue campaigns) with little money but true democratic support to win elections.

  • 2

    Feb

    2016

    We will be joined by Carol Drogus, Interim Director of Off-Campus Study. Our goals are to assess from students who have already traveled abroad what they enjoyed about their programs and how they chose programs and courses, and to discuss with students thinking about going abroad the process to do so. We'll also discuss some new ideas we have been thinking about that are relevant to computer-science students. This is an opportunity to share experiences and have questions answered.

    Lunch will, of course, be served. Hope to see you there!

    To all sophomores: remember that the deadline for approved programs is Friday, February 5.

  • 26

    Jan

    2016

    Are you interested to write a graphics program based on a piece of art Colgate owns?

    We will run a curricular workshop to help you doing so. Everyone is welcome to
    join: students from COSC101/102 to 435 interested in art please come to this department tea!

    During this tea, Prof. Fourquet will:
    - present the project connected to the Picker Gallery and
    - give a short talk about composition

  • 19

    Jan

    2016

    Join the department for an informal get together to start the semester.

  • 7

    Dec

    2015

    We will have a job candidate give a talk. Lunch will be served, so please join us!

  • 4

    Dec

    2015

    We will have a job candidate give a talk. Lunch will be provided, so please join us!

  • 1

    Dec

    2015

    We will have a job candidate talk during the next department tea slot. Lunch will be provided, so please join us!

  • 17

    Nov

    2015

    For our department tea on November 17, Cindy Han and Abeneazer Chafamo will talk about the research they did with Prof. Hay this past summer. Lunch will be available.

    Title: Differentially Private Machine Learning: An Empirical Evaluation of Differentially Private Classifiers
    Abstract: Machine learning is a subfield of artificial intelligence that focuses on recognizing and learning patterns from real data in order to make predictions. For our research project, we were particularly interested in classifiers. A classifier is a machine learning method that uses pattern matching to attempt to assign a label/class to an observation. For example, classifiers can be used to label an email as spam, to predict a patient’s risk level for a particular disease, etc. In certain cases, data that is used to build these classifiers is sensitive (e.g. medical data) and people need a privacy guarantee before they volunteer their data. One of the most prevalent methods of trying to ensure privacy is anonymization or the removal of personal identification information; however, anonymization doesn’t provide sufficient privacy, thus we need a more robust method of privacy. Differential privacy is a proposed alternative to anonymization. It ensures that computations be insensitive to changes in an individual’s record. Differential privacy achieves this by adding noise to the statistical computations. There has been much research in the past on differentially private classifiers; however, there has not yet been a comprehensive study of the existing differentially private classifiers. The goals of the project were to look at the current algorithms in the field and do an empirical comparison and to propose possible improvements to current algorithms.

  • 10

    Nov

    2015

    For our next department tea, we will be joined remotely by Te-Yuan Huang and Laura Pruitt from Netflix.
    Come for lunch and to learn a bit about how Netflix video streaming works!

    Title: A Day in the Life of Netflix Video Streaming

    Abstract: Video streaming is a huge and growing fraction of Internet traffic.
    Netflix alone accounts for over 37% of the peak download traffic in
    the United State. This talk will give an introduction on how Netflix
    video streaming works, including how video is distributed over the
    Internet and how video quality is adapted. This talk will also briefly
    touch upon the research questions in video adaptive streaming and
    provide an overview on the recent academic and industrial efforts.

  • 3

    Nov

    2015

    For our next department tea, we will be joined (remotely) by Dharmesh Bhatt '13 who currently works for Uber. Dharmesh will talk about the mobile application release process and A/B testing within Uber. Lunch will be available, as usual.

  • 27

    Oct

    2015

    Our department tea on October 27 will feature a guest speaker, Marwan Fayed, from the University of Stirling in the UK. Marwan will talk about his work in adaptive video streaming. As usual, lunch will be available, too.

    Speaker: Marwan Fayed, University of Stirling, Scotland, UK
    Title: Network-layer Fairness for Adaptive Video Streaming
    Abstract: Netflix, iPlayer, YouTube, and the like, are now the dominant sources of traffic on the Internet. Recent studies observe that competing adaptive video streams generate flows that lead to instability, under-utilization, and unfairness behind bottleneck links. Additional measurements suggest there may also be a negative impact on users' perceived quality of experience as a consequence. While it may be intuitive to resolve application-generated issues at the application layer, in this presentation I shall demonstrate the merits of a network layer solution. I will present a new network-layer metric that reflects user experience. Experiments using our open-source implementation in the home environment reveals that the network-layer may just be the right place to attack the general problem.

    Reference: http://dl.ifip.org/db/conf/networking/networking2015/1570066341.pdf

    Marwan Fayed received his MA from Boston University and his PhD from the University of Ottawa, in 2003 and 2009 respectively, and in between worked at Microsoft as a member of the Core Reliability Group. He joined the faculty at the University of Stirling, UK in 2009 as under the Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance (SICSA) scheme. He has since been appointed 'Theme Leader' for networking research in Scotland. His current research interests lie in wireless algorithms, as well as general network, transport, and measurement in next generation edge networks. He is a co-founder of HUBS C.I.C., an ISP focussed on rural communities, and serves on committees of IEEE and ACM conferences.

  • 20

    Oct

    2015

    For our department tea on October 20, Lillie Pentecost '16 will talk about the summer research she did with Prof. Stratton. Join us for her research talk and lunch!

    Speaker: Lillie Pentecost '16
    Title: Accelerating Dynamically Typed Languages with a Virtual Function Cache
    Abstract: Dynamically typed languages are increasingly important to programmers of all levels because they allow for extended class hierarchies with shared interfaces and inheritance. Virtual functions are a key element in implementing these interesting and useful features. However, virtual functions are more costly than static equivalents, so they are often avoided either in code or by aggressive compiler optimizations. This summer, Professor Stratton and I designed, implemented, and did preliminary tests of hardware support for the execution of virtual function calls in the form of a Virtual Function Cache. By providing support to virtual functions at the hardware level, we aim to improve overall performance of dynamically typed languages and other applications of indirect function calls so that programmers can reap the benefits of these features without suffering performance costs.

  • 6

    Oct

    2015

    For our department tea on October 6, we are happy to have Mike Komosinski '11 join us as our speaker. Lunch will be provided.

    Title: Coding after Colgate
    Speaker: Mike Komosinski ‘11, Google
    Description:
    Most of us plan on working as a software developer after graduation. Some of us have had internships to better prepare us for that day. But what is the job actually like, and what does it mean to code as part of a team? Mike Komosinski ‘11, front-end software engineer at Google and previously engineer at Amplify Education, will join us to talk about the abbreviated wisdoms he’s gained in four years on the job. He’ll answer questions like “what do you do in a typical day?”, “what do you wish you knew earlier?”, and “can you get me a job at Google??”. Refreshments, cool swag, and a rant about git will also be provided!

  • 29

    Sep

    2015

    Ethics in computer science relates to how professionals within the discipline should make decisions and conduct themselves. The main professional society within computer science, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), has a Code of Ethics that members are expected to abide by, which includes principles such as avoiding harm to others and respecting the privacy of others (see https://www.acm.org/about/code-of-ethics for the full list). These principles, while useful, may not provide obvious answers when confronted with questions such as how much testing is enough when life-critical software is concerned, or the obligations of software developers concerning security and/or privacy breaches, or what ethical decisions should be encoded in software itself.

    Join us for our next tea in which we'll have a discussion on ethics in the computing profession. Lunch will be provided.

  • 22

    Sep

    2015

    Join us for our department tea on September 22 in students Duy Tran and Michael Chavinda will talk about their research with Prof. Elodie Fourquet. Lunch will be provided.

    Talk abstract:
    Graphics packages that support non-­trivial drawing usually require an overwhelming amount of mathematical and computational knowledge to use. Computer science departments, as a result, tend not to offer graphics­-intensive courses until advanced undergraduate classes. Our project is to create a powerful but simple graphics library in Python and Java that is tailored for novice programmers.

  • 15

    Sep

    2015

    Our next department tea will feature a discussion with computer science department alums who currently work for Epic, a company based in Madison, Wisconsin, that develops software for the healthcare industry. We will talk with alums about their experiences working at Epic, including technical and work-life aspects. Lunch will be provided, too.

  • 8

    Sep

    2015

    Computer Science will participate in the 9th annual Ho Symposium on summer student research sponsored by the Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics. Michael Chavinda, one of the student researchers working on a distinction-winning project mentored by Prof. Fourquet, will briefly present his research.

  • 1

    Sep

    2015

    Please join the COSC department for the first department tea of the semester as we welcome new and returning students back. Food will be served

  • 21

    Apr

    2015

    Join us for our next department tea! We will have two speakers, Farah Fouladi '15 and Sam Daulton '15. Each will speak about their final project from Professor Ay's course on Modeling of Biological Systems.

    Lunch will be served following the talks.

    Title: Predicting Cancer using Mutual Information-based Gene Association Networks
    Speaker: Sam Daulton '15
    Abstract: Machine-learning algorithms can be used on gene expression data as an alternative to traditional clinical methods for diagnosing cancer and determining a patient’s prognosis. A standardized, accurate approach to classifying and diagnosing colon cancer does not exist. Little is known about molecular alterations associated with the heterogeneity of the disease, and no molecular marker has been validated for clinical practice as a diagnostic or prognostic parameter. We propose a novel supervised classification algorithm, the NBC-A method, for predicting cancer from gene expression data with greater accuracy and for identifying genetic biomarkers. NBC-A improves the NBC method developed by Ay et al. in 2014 by constructing gene association networks using mutual information as the statistical metric instead of Pearson correlation. We expect NBC-A to produce transcriptional networks that are more indicative of the underlying biological pathways of colorectal cancer, leading to discovery of new biomarkers. NBC-A yields higher classification accuracies than many traditional classifiers including Support Vector Machine (SVM), k-Nearest Neighbors (kNN), and Naïve Bayes (NB) on the tested colon cancer dataset. In addition, NBC-A outperforms all other methods tested (NBC, SVM, kNN, NB, and Random Forest (RF)) on a lung cancer dataset.

    Title: TBD
    Speaker: Farah Fouladi '15
    Abstract: TBD

  • 14

    Apr

    2015

    Join us for our next department tea! Our speaker will be our very own Chris Nevison who will talk about some new features in Java for parallel computing.

    Lunch will be served following the talk.

    Title: Parallel Computing in Java
    Speaker: Chris Nevison, Professor of Computer Science

    Over the past few years Java has added a number of new tools for concurrent and parallel programming. With multi-core chips in most computers today, these tools are easy to use. In this talk I will describe some of these new tools and demonstrate their use.

  • 7

    Apr

    2015

    Join us for our next department tea! Our speaker will be Jessica Cundiff, who studies gender bias and has looked specifically at such biases in the field of computer science. This should be an informative talk!

    Lunch will be served following the talk.

    Title: Addressing the gender gap in computer science: Why are women underrepresented and what can we do about it?
    Speaker: Jessica Cundiff, Visiting Assistant Professor of Pyschology

    Women continue to be underrepresented in computer science, with only 22% of bachelor’s degrees awarded to women over the last 10 years. Drawing from recent work in social psychology, this talk examines the factors that contribute to women’s underrepresentation in computer science. The talk will also present potential strategies for increasing gender diversity and inclusion, focusing on implementing change at both the structural level and interpersonal level within academic departments. Although the talk focuses on closing the gender gap, the strategies presented have potential for increasing interest and retention in computer science more broadly.

  • 31

    Mar

    2015

    Join us for our next department tea! Our speaker will be Tristan Lawrence, a Site Reliability Engineer at Google. Tristan graduated from Colgate in 1997 with a dual major in Asian Studies and Physical Science. After graduation, he began working in the IT industry and has been working at Google since 2005.

    Lunch will be served following the talk.

    Title: A Cluster of Spiders
    Speaker: Tristan Lawrence '97, Google

    The first step in indexing the Internet is to download it. But how do you replicate such a widely distributed, dynamic entity? Tristan Lawrence '97, a Site Reliability Engineer from Google, will discuss the challenges of implementing a web crawl at Google scale and explore the lessons Google engineers have learned while operating some of the world's most complex and data-intensive online services.

  • 24

    Mar

    2015

    Join us for our next department tea! Our speaker will be Jason Keith, Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Colgate. He will be talking about his research which brings together ideas and techniques from three sciences: Chemistry, Physics, and Computer Science.

    Lunch will be served following the talk.

    Title: High Performance Computing and Quantum Chemistry
    Speaker: Jason Keith, Assistant Professor of Chemistry

    With the rise in computational power of the last quarter century and the development of new faster quantum chemical techniques such as density functional theory computation has become a requisite part of modern chemistry research. This includes examination of chemical structures, various types of spectroscopy including vibrational and electronic as well as the understanding of chemical reaction mechanisms and the resulting kinetics. His talk will focus on the basic machinery of quantum based techniques as well as the presentation of some of his current results.

  • 24

    Feb

    2015

    Take a break from classes and join us for lunch on February 24, at 11:20.

  • 17

    Feb

    2015

    Join us on both Tuesday and Thursday of this week for department tea. Check your email for more information about the teas.

  • 10

    Feb

    2015

    Join us for our department tea on Feb. 10. This week we will have a conversation around "side projects." By this, we mean extracurricular projects that involve coding that students do out of interest or out of a desire to develop skills, etc. that will help them on the job market.

    Several students have agreed to give very brief presentations about their side projects.

    - Saul Shanabrook: "Scraping Colgate for fun and for profit"
    - Mike Dunnegan: "BudgetMan, an independent personal budget management application"
    - Matt Brauner: "Dynamic Web Design Using Django"
    - ... and maybe others...

    Please come to hear about their work, to share your own projects, and/or to learn how you might start a project on your own. For students looking to form a team to work on a bigger project, this is an opportunity to find other students who are looking for the same. The faculty will also chime in with some advice.

  • 3

    Feb

    2015

    Join us for out department tea on Feb. 3. This summer there will be several opporunities for students to stay on campus and do research with the COSC faculty. Come to this tea to hear brief presentations by Professors Fourquet, Stratton, Sommers, and Hay. Each will describe the projects they will be working on and the potential opportunities for student involvement. Take a break and join us for lunch and discussion!

    The presentations will be in the research lounge followed by lunch at the other end of the hall.

  • 27

    Jan

    2015

    Welcome back! Please join the COSC department faculty for our next department tea, January 27, at 11:20. Our tea will be a friendly and casual discussion over lunch this week. Come and join us for lunch and discussion.

  • 9

    Dec

    2014

    All majors and minors are encouraged to attend an end-of-semester party on Tuesday 12/9 in the CS department lounge. We hope you'll join us for much food and merriment!

  • 2

    Dec

    2014

    Please join the COSC department faculty for our next department tea, December 2, at 11:20. Our tea will be a friendly and casual discussion over lunch this week. Take a break and join us for lunch and discussion!

  • 18

    Nov

    2014

    CCS for COSC: What can Career Services do for you?

    Join Michael Sciola and James Reed for an open discussion of career resources and student interests.

    Michael Sciola, AVP and director of career services, is a 20+ year veteran in guiding students of all backgrounds and interests to a successful career launch. James Reed joins CCS this fall from RPI to advise students interested in STEM careers.

    Lunch will be available following the discussion.

  • 11

    Nov

    2014

    Join us for our department tea on November 11. Prof. Stratton will be our speaker, and lunch will be provided following his talk.

    Historically, compilers were built to solve the two biggest problems in the transition to high-level languages: accurately interpreting high-level language syntax and efficiently generating a sequence of machine instructions that performed the proscribed computation. Today, these are largely solved problems, but the demands of programmers and systems alike create new challenges and opportunities for code analysis and transformation technology. This talk will be an overview of some of the new problems compilers are trying to solve, including some of my current work on compilers for education and compilers for parallel and heterogeneous systems.

  • 4

    Nov

    2014

    Please join us for our next department tea, November 4, at 11:20. Our tea will be a friendly and casual discussion, including discussion of 400-level courses offered in Spring '15. Lunch will be provided.

  • 28

    Oct

    2014

    At our next department tea, Jack Sneeringer '16 and Martin Liu '16 will talk about research they did at Colgate over the past summer. Lunch will be served following their talk.

    Abstract: Large data centers are often looking for ways to improve performance, however it is difficult to estimate how potential upgrades will affect performance. A network simulator should be able to provide an estimate. However, existing network simulators are extremely accurate and unscalable or scalable but wildly inaccurate. Our research was focused on developing an accurate and highly scalable network simulator.

    Data is sent over the Internet in small pieces called packets. The best way to visualize this is to think of a table you might order from IKEA. The table isn’t shipped to you in one piece, but instead is shipped in small pieces and is assembled once all of the pieces have arrived. A file is transmitted across a network in the same way. This is an important notion for network simulation because sending a single file across a network is thousands of simulation events.

    Our simulator aims to improve scalability through the use of “flowlets.” Flowlets are designed to reduce packet level computation while still realistically simulating traffic. A flowlet is a “super packet” that is handled by the network as a single packet but is the size of 10 or 20 packets. Using flowlets reduces the number of simulation events significantly while still representing traffic flow fairly well. A nice feature of flowlets is that they are completely adjustable. The user can decide how large to make a single flowlet depending on his or her personal preference for accuracy or efficiency.

    Our simulator also aims to improve scalability through the use of XCP instead of TCP. The use of XCP was motivated by the difficulty of implementing flowlets in TCP. For instance, TCP requires packet loss to tell the sender to reduce traffic but figuring out how to drop a flowlet is difficult. A nice feature of XCP is that it does not allow for packet loss. In addition, XCP is more scalable from a simulation standpoint than TCP. XCP calculations are done on switches, not at the end user. This means that the number of calculations scales with the number of switches and not the number of end users.

  • 21

    Oct

    2014

    The speaker for our next department tea will be Farah Fouladi '15, who will talk about the internship she did this past summer. Lunch will be available after her talk.

    Abstract:
    By mathematically modeling biological systems we can predict the effect of small changes in the system that are difficult to measure experimentally. This analysis requires multiple simulations of the model for every parameter variation. While this type of analysis is feasible for isolated cells, running many simulations of large systems of cells is extremely time consuming. To decrease the execution time of these model simulations, I have developed a parallelized environment, which utilizes the architecture of a graphics processing unit.

    The GPU has many processor cores and the ability for thousands of threads to run concurrently on those cores. For my research, a mathematical model of the human ventricular myocyte (ten Tusscher & Panfilov, Am J Physiol 291: H1088–H1100, 2006) was programmed in CUDA. Taking advantage of the parallel hardware, cell computations along with different simulations of the model are completed on the GPU by many threads running simultaneously. To validate this computational design, cell membrane voltage values were compared with an already existing model implementation in MATLAB. Results showed that the added parallelization has no effect on the computational aspect of the model and that the execution time of the CUDA program decreases by orders of magnitude compared to the previously used MATLAB program.

    Using this new computational environment, I analyzed one cause of reentry in cardiac myocytes. Reentry occurs when an electric propagation loops back on itself, abnormally re-exciting cells. There is a short window of time during which a stimulus can excite cardiac tissue and cause a reentry effect due to refractory tissue blocking action potential propagation in only one direction. My program is able to efficiently identify the stimulus-timing interval when reentry occurs in a loop of 1,000 cells.

    This parallelized simulation environment minimizes computational execution time and provides a framework for further analysis of more complex and physiologically relevant systems of cells

  • 7

    Oct

    2014

    The Raspberry Pi is a small, low-cost, Linux-based computer introduced in 2012 (see http://http://www.raspberrypi.org), which contains interesting capabilities for software development and prototyping. In the CS department, we are planning to use these computers to drive the (currently dark) screens around the department in order to display announcements, information specific to different rooms, and other content. In this department tea, we'll discuss general capabilities and features of the Pi's, as well as examine a prototype display system. The prototype system is written in Python, and the department is interested in having students involved in further development of the system. All students are encouraged to attend, and lunch will be available after the talk and discussion.

  • 30

    Sep

    2014

    For our department tea on 9/30, our speaker will be from Ernst & Young financial services, NYC and will talk about career opportunities in technology consulting. Lunch will be available after their presentation.

  • 23

    Sep

    2014

    Michael Dermody ("Derm") and Frank Perrelli from BNY Mellon will be the speakers for our department tea on 9/23. They will present on two topics that should be of interest to both beginning and upper-level students. Lunch will be available after their presentation.

    Quick highlight of BNY Mellon as a company: company history - who and what we are!

    Computing Jobs from A to Z": The Computing field is not just programming anymore. This presentation looks at some of jobs in the field and what they entail. If you are undecided, or if you've ever wondered if you could handle a computing job, this would be a good presentation to attend. We discuss everything from what type of companies you may work for to salaries and interviewing skills.

    Michael Dermody, "Derm", a Vice President in the Client Technology Solutions group started working at BNY Mellon 14 years ago in the Syracuse Office. He has worked in many different capacities at the firm including work as a Developer, Team Lead, Project Manager, Intern Program Manager, also in IT Learning and Development, and as a SIRO (Senior Information Risk Officer.) Currently he works in the Application Security group as a Mainframe Analyst.

    Frank Perrelli worked for Pershing, LLC, an affiliate of BNY Mellon, for 14 years. For the last six years he has served as the Global Information Security Officer with responsibility for affiliates in the US, UK, India, and Australia. Frank was transferred to BNY Mellon as the Managing Director of the Application Security Center of Excellence, and moved to Central New York to form a new App Sec team. Frank now serves as the BNY Mellon CSIRO.

  • 16

    Sep

    2014

    Join us for our next department tea! Lunch will be available and our speaker will be Lauren Yeary who will talk about her internship experience over the past summer:

    "OMG I got an internship in Silicon Valley!! I am the real deal!! I am OFFICIALLY a computer scientist!" This was the thought that ran through my head after I got accepted to be a summer intern at Chegg in Santa Clara. My job at Chegg was my first experience working in the 'real world' with my CS skills so I was curious as to what it would actually be like to work instead of learn. I was surprised to find out that a big part of working as a software engineer was learning! From the super cool offices (and free lunches!) to the incredibly smart, talented and creative people all around me -- my summer at Chegg was far beyond what I could have imagined! Come hear about what I did all summer, what I learned and all about my experience in the valley!

  • 2

    Sep

    2014

    Please join the COSC department for the first department tea of the semester as we welcome new and returning students, welcome new faculty, and enjoy our new department space. Food will be available.

  • 22

    Apr

    2014

    Please join the COSC department faculty for our next department tea, April 22, at 11:20. Our tea will be a friendly and casual discussion over lunch this week, and will also be the last tea of the semester. Take a break and join us for lunch and discussion!

  • 8

    Apr

    2014

    This department tea will be an overview and discussion of the two 400-level courses being offered in the Fall 2014 term. Prof. Hay will talk about the Databases course that he will be teaching, and Prof. Mulry will talk about the Advanced Theory course that he will be teaching. All students are encouraged to attend to learn about these two advanced courses. Lunch will be provided.

  • 11

    Mar

    2014

    Title: A Survey of Digital Advertising: How the Cookies are Baked
    Speaker: Andres Echenique '83, Senior Partner, Eric Mower + Associates

    Andres will be giving a brief talk reviewing the essentials of digital
    advertising, from the humble banner ad, to paid search, ad networks,
    retargeting, behavioral tracking, and real-time bidding in demand- and
    supply-side platforms. Advertising technology has become a robust market
    for large scale technical innovation and is growing quickly, especially as
    "big data" promises new critical business insights.

    Andres leads digital strategy at Eric Mower + Associates, an integrated
    marketing communications agency with specialized expertise in
    business-to-business marketing, public relations and public affairs,
    consumer advertising, shopper marketing and digital/direct/relationship
    marketing. With offices in Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse and Albany, N.Y.;
    Cincinnati; Charlotte, N.C.; and Atlanta, EMA serves clients throughout
    the United States. EMA has 250 professionals and estimated $236 million in
    capitalized billings for 2013.

  • 11

    Feb

    2014

    For COSC 480: Software Engineering for the Cloud during the Spring '13 semester, Sean Bjornsson '14, Tom Charron '14, and John Grossmann '14 built a project hub website to centralize computer science projects. Many people at Colgate, or in the Hamilton area, have an idea for a website or an app, but do not have the skills to build it. There are also many computer science students who wish to get involved with projects outside of the classroom in order to gain experience, to build their resume, or even for employment opportunity but do not know where to look. People with good ideas, technical or non technical, can be partnered with computer science students and programmers to implement them.

    Sean, Tom, and John are now looking to the department to see if faculty and students would find this tool useful and, if so, what additional features the website would need to be widely used on campus. Any and all feedback will be very appreciated, so please come to the CS lounge, enjoy some lunch, and help critique this website.

  • 4

    Feb

    2014

    How are modern web-based applications put together? What are the functional components and how are they composed to provide a "rich" application experience within a browser window? Join us for our next department tea, in which we will talk about the back-end, the front-end, and everything in between. As usual, lunch will be served.

  • 28

    Jan

    2014

    Welcome back! Please join the COSC department faculty for our next department tea, January 28, at 11:20. Our tea will be a friendly and casual discussion over lunch this week. Come and join us for lunch and discussion.

  • 19

    Nov

    2013

    Please join the COSC department faculty for our next department tea, November 19, at 11:20. Our tea will be a friendly and casual discussion over lunch this week. Take a break and join us for lunch and discussion!

  • 12

    Nov

    2013

    Are global variables really that bad? Although this question has not sparked any real religious wars, it is nevertheless a recurring subject of debate among software developers and CS students. What alternatives exist to globals, and are there situations where their use is appropriate? How do different programming languages handle the issue of global variables? Join us for our weekly department tea where we will discuss these and other critical matters! Lunch will be provided.

  • 5

    Nov

    2013

    This department tea will be an overview and discussion of the two 400-level courses being offered in the Spring 2014 term. Prof. Hay will talk about the Artificial Intelligence course that he will be teaching, and Prof. Sommers will talk about the Computer Networking course that he will be teaching. All students are encouraged to attend to learn about these two advanced courses. Lunch will be provided.

  • 29

    Oct

    2013

    Our next department tea will feature Curt Mahoney '14. Curt will talk about the research he did over the past summer. Lunch will be provided.

  • 22

    Oct

    2013

    Please join the COSC department faculty for our next department tea, October 22, at 11:20. Our tea will be a friendly and casual discussion over lunch this week. Take a break from studying for your midterms, and join us!

  • 8

    Oct

    2013

    You're invited to an information discussion with department faculty about graduate programs and fellowships. Learn about various opportunities and the application process (including writing a personal statement, asking for letters, etc.), what programs are like and what they expect from you. This tea isn't just for seniors --- learning about these opportunities early in your career can help you decide whether this is an avenue to pursue and can help you better prepare if you're interested. Bring any and all questions, and hope to see you there!

    Lunch will be served.

  • 1

    Oct

    2013

    Join us for our next department tea! Our speaker will be Michael Francis, CTO of Recipe into Reality (RiR). RiR is a Hamilton-based startup, with roots in the Thought Into Action program at Colgate.

    Lunch will be served.

    Title: Startup life from the eyes of a first time CTO
    Speaker: Michael Francis

    Michael will be giving a brief talk about his experiences working as the CTO of a new startup company. He will cover topics such as how he decided to choose certain languages to use, as well as his experiences managing a team of engineers. Michael is a recent graduate of Humber College in Toronto, Canada. He started coding at 6 years old when he built a functioning computer out of scraps and manipulated the source code to beat his friend at the popular game “Guerillas” -- he's been exploring computer science ever since. He is passionate about implementing new technologies to solve problems in the world.

  • 24

    Sep

    2013

    Please join us for our next department tea, with guest speaker Dr. Lee Seversky. Food will be served afterward.

    Title: Complex Networks and Information
    Speaker: Dr. Lee Seversky, Air Force Research Laboratory, Information Directorate, Rome NY

    Complex networks and information seeks to understand mathematically how fundamental approaches to information exchange influence overall network and system performance and behavior. From this understanding we wish to develop strategies to assess and influence the predictability and performance of heterogeneous types of networks and information systems that must provide reliable transfer of data in dynamic and high interference environments. The goal is to develop approaches to describe information content, protocol, policy, structure, and dynamic behavior by mathematically characterizing network and information systems so that we may understand fundamental limits in system behavior, inference in the presence of measured data, and design of secure and fault-tolerant information systems.

    Dr. Seversky is a research scientist at the Air Force Research Laboratory, Information Directorate in Rome, NY. He is a principal researcher in the Complex Networks and Information research group at the Information Directorate, leading the development of new techniques in the areas of low-rank modeling, active learning, geometry processing, and computational topology. This talk will highlight his recent work in the areas of geometry processing with uncertainty, active learning methods for human-in-the-loop tasking, and robust online subspace tracking under changing observation dimensionality.

  • 19

    Sep

    2013

    Join us for the first Women in Computer Science meeting this Thursday, September 19th in the Computer Science lounge! Majors and minors, as well as all females interested in working in technology, are encouraged to attend. Women in Computer Science is a new club focused on creating an alumni network of female Colgate graduates working in technology, supplying resources for female Computer Science students to look for funding and internship opportunities, and supporting a mentoring or tutoring system for women in the department.

  • 17

    Sep

    2013

    Join us for our department tea on September 17. Our speaker will be Kevin Kwiat, from the Air Force Research Lab facility in Rome, NY. Food will be served.

    Title: Survivability in Cyberspace

    Abstract: The seemingly endless breadth of cyberspace coupled with the technological
    depth of its composition can divide defensive approaches to be either
    overarching or highly specific. In order to abstract away details for the
    purpose of tractability, overarching approaches can suffer because
    simplistic models for threats, vulnerabilities, and exploits tend to yield
    defenses that are too optimistic. Approaches that deal with specific
    threats, vulnerabilities and exploits may be more credible but can quickly
    lose their meaningfulness as technology changes. Whether approaches are near
    or far term, there are two underlying attributes that remain essential: the
    ability to survive and the ability to fight through.

    Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited: 88ABW-2010-1117

  • 10

    Sep

    2013

    Join us for a discussion about aspects of summer internships, jobs, and research positions available to undergraduates. Current CS students will talk about their positions, including what they did, what the interview or application process is like, and what they learned and did over the summer.

    Food will be served!

  • 3

    Sep

    2013

    Please join the COSC department faculty as we welcome new and returning students, and have an informal discussion ranging on topics such as:
    - Doing research in the department such as honors these or summer research
    - Faculty research areas of interest
    - Applying for grad schools or jobs
    - Fellowships and scholarships
    - Internships

    Food will be served.

  • 19

    Mar

    2013

    Continuing an ad-hoc theme, Prof. Sommers will lead a department tea on "The Tao of Network Control."

    As usual, lunch will be available.

  • 5

    Mar

    2013

    Prof. Mulry will lead a department tea with the intriguing title: "Zen and the art of data type maintenance." (With apologies to Robert Pirsig, of course.)

    As usual, lunch will be available.

  • 12

    Feb

    2013

    Ever wonder what a job in the field of computing is like? Join us for our department tea as Josh Zukoff '13, Carson Carlisle '11, and M. Paul Weeks '12 will be back to discuss their experiences on the job at ZocDoc in NYC.

    As usual, lunch will be available.

  • 4

    Dec

    2012

    All majors and minors are encouraged to attend an end-of-semester party on Tuesday 12/4 in the CS department lounge. We hope you'll join us for much food and merriment!

  • 27

    Nov

    2012

    Title: Yao's Non-adaptive storage problem with 2 queries

    Join us for a presentation and discussion by Prof. David Howard, Math department.
    As usual, lunch will be available.

    In this talk I will briefly describe a research problem I worked on that is located somewhere between mathematics and computer science. The problem involves a mathematical storage scheme.

    The set-up:

    At the Raider Inn there are n rooms and as this is a very special inn only m specific people in the whole world are allowed to spend the night in the inn. Furthermore as this inn is very popular every night it is completely filled with guests but only one person can stay per room. There are of course 13 managers in this hotel and they each know what the storage scheme for this hotel is (i.e. for any n set from the m people that stays in the hotel one night there is an exact predetermined assignment of rooms depending on the n set). Furthermore, for each member in the special m set of people there exist two special rooms (which are not necessarily uniquely assigned to the members of m) called their query rooms. These query rooms are special in the following way: Suppose a manager does not have the guest list for a particular night at the hotel; however, the manager wants to know if a particular person (call this person Jack) is in the hotel for the given evening. All this manager must do is find out who is staying in Jack's special query rooms and the manager can definitively answer whether Jack is staying in the hotel. (Note: the answer can be yes even if the manager did not see Jack in either query room.)

    The question that arises given this set-up: How big can m be in relation to n?

    I will briefly say what the going results are and, if time allows, future research directions for this topic.

  • 9

    Nov

    2012

    Title: Cybersecurity Research at Syracuse University
    Speaker: Steve Chapin, Associate Professor
    Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, Syracuse University

    Would you like to build operating systems that are more secure and reliable than Windows? Perhaps develop smart, secure charging infrastructure for future electric vehicles? Or increase the security of the Android operating system?

    Faculty and students in the department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Syracuse University are working on all of these problems, and more. In this talk, I will give an overview of cybersecurity research at SU, and describe two projects in particular. Students considering graduate study in Computer Science or Computer Engineering are particularly encouraged to attend.

    Lunch will be available.

  • 6

    Nov

    2012

    Speaker: Assistant Professor Joel Sommers.
    Title: Cell versus WiFi: An adventure in data analysis

    Over the last five years, there has been an explosion in
    the availability and use of mobile devices that are both cellular- and
    802.11 WiFi-enabled. Driven by the popularity of applications that
    run on these hybrid devices, such as iOS- and Android-based
    smartphones, there is a large and growing demand for network bandwidth
    by mobile users. Unfortunately, there remains a lack of empirical
    understanding as to how cellular and WiFi performance compare, and the
    causes behind observed performance in a range of diverse settings. In
    this talk, I'll discuss recent work in which we analyzed 3 months of
    Speedtest data, and what we have discovered so far regarding cellular
    versus WiFi performance.

    As usual, lunch will be available.

  • 23

    Oct

    2012

    Title: Hide Me Maybe: does anonymity beget privacy?

    Join us for a talk and discussion led by Prof. Michael Hay.

    If we have some sensitive data (e.g., medical records),
    can we safely publish it if we exclude identifying information? The
    answer is both yes and no. This discussion aims to shed light on
    whether we can really "hide in a crowd."

    As usual, lunch will be available.

  • 16

    Oct

    2012

    Title: You can't always get what you want -- an algorithms case study
    Prof. Vijay Ramachandran

    This talk will review tradeoffs in the design of algorithms for
    network-fault detection based on active probing. In our problem
    setting, active probing refers to sending test traffic in a network so
    that its performance characteristics can be measured and analyzed to
    help diagnose problematic network components. For example, if test
    traffic sent along a path does not arrive at its destination, that may
    suggest that an intermediate link or node has failed. While active
    probing can help detect faults quickly, it comes at a cost: the extra
    test traffic imposes communication and computational load on the
    network. Thus, we're interested in designing probing techniques that
    detect faults without consuming too many resources. Our work
    describes a framework for designing and analyzing probing algorithms
    and unfortunately demonstrates that achieving certain combinations of
    desirable properties is computationally intractable.

    This work is inspired by earlier work of Prof. Sommers, and is a
    collaboration with Prof. Jaggard (visitor at Colgate, 2010-2012),
    among others.

    As usual, lunch will be available.

  • 3

    Oct

    2012

    Microsoft is coming to your campus!

    Learn more about the positions we have to offer at our "Meet the Company and Day in the Life of an Intern" presentation.

    Detailed postings for the positions are available on Colgate's Career Services website (naviGATE). Positions include Software Development Engineer and Technical Consultant.

    If you have the talent and passion for technology, this could be your big moment. Come find out more about our full-time and internship opportunities in the Seattle area!

    Eat free food and bring your resume for a chance to win cool prizes!!

    Questions? Want to apply online? Check out our website at http://www.microsoft.com/university.

  • 2

    Oct

    2012

    What's all the fuss about monads?

    Join us for our weekly department tea, in which Prof. Philip Mulry will help us understand what the fuss is all about.

    As usual, lunch will be provided.

  • 25

    Sep

    2012

    Title: The Effects of Multipath IP Routing on TCP Performance
    Speaker: Rohan Mehta '14

    Over the summer, I studied the impact of using multiple paths for routing in the IP layer. Multiple paths could improve performance by better utilising the resources in the network, but it could also negatively affect performance because of TCP congestion control mechanisms. To test this, we used a network simulator called ns2, which can be programmed using c++ and OTcl. We conducted thousands of trials and then parsed and analyzed the trace files generated by the simulator. We ran through a number of hypotheses and improved the automated systems we used to conduct tests. The simulations we conducted seemed to suggest that TCP performance is much better when routing is done using one path, unless the paths can somehow be constructed to have near-identical delays, which is impractical.

  • 21

    Sep

    2012

    Title: How to be sure that your vote is counted -- even when everyone is trying to cheat

    Speaker: Josh Benaloh, Senior Cryptographer, Microsoft Research

    Abstract: After you cast a vote in an election, how confident are you that it will be properly counted? Typical election systems require voters to trust the integrity and competence of election workers and equipment vendors. Any break in a long chain of custody can cause votes to be lost and yield unreliable outcomes. But there’s a better way. Verifiable election technologies allow individual voters to check that their votes –- and the votes of all voters –- have been properly counted. This is true even in the presence of dishonest election personnel and malicious equipment – and it isn’t even that hard to do.

    For more information about the speaker and his work, see his home page: http://research.microsoft.com/~benaloh/

    Reception to follow in Cunniff Commons (Ho Science Center Atrium).

  • 20

    Sep

    2012

    The fall department barbecue will be catered by Doug's Holy Smoke BBQ this year. Menu will include pulled pork, veggie burgers, garlic potatoes, coleslaw, and pies for dessert. Prizes will be awarded.

    This event is for DECLARED COSC CONCENTRATORS (majors and minors) only, and YOU MUST RSVP to attend. Please contact Char Jablonski to be included on the list.

  • 18

    Sep

    2012

    Join us for a discussion about aspects of summer internships, including:

    - What the interview process is like
    - Examples of different types of positions that our students have held
    - Differences among companies and teams, such as work environment, expectations, and responsibilities
    - Other general advice!

    Our featured student speakers include:
    - Dharmesh Bhatt (Microsoft)
    - Marius Dragus (Facebook)
    - Josh Zukoff (ZocDoc)

    Food will be served!

  • 11

    Sep

    2012

    There will be food!

    Now that we have your attention, please join the COSC department faculty as we have an informal discussion ranging on topics such as:
    - Doing research in the department such as honors these or summer research
    - Faculty research areas of interest
    - Applying for grad schools or jobs
    - Fellowships and scholarships
    - Internships

    And yes, there will be food.

  • 14

    Apr

    2012

    We invite students taking a a COSC course, especially those in 101 and 102, for lunch in the COSC lounge this Saturday from 11:00am to 2:00pm. We encourage anyone that is interested in Computer Science, academically or just for fun, to come and meet other people with similar interests, as well as ask upperclassmen any questions about being a COSC major at Colgate, internship opportunities, jobs, research and anything else you can think about.

    We also want people to do some coding over lunch! Yes, coding! The Google CodeJam is starting this Friday at 7pm and ending at Saturday 8pm and anybody can sign up including those in COSC 101 or 102! You can use any programming language, and all you have to do is solve some problems to qualify for the next round. They usually take a couple hours to complete but you can spend as much time as you want until Saturday 8pm. Google’s annual contest is one of the most prestigious contests around and qualifying would be a great experience. (To register for the Google CodeJam click here: http://code.google.com/codejam/ )

    In addition to providing lunch there will be snacks for people who want to come and hang out with other COSC majors throughout the day, ask any questions and work on the CodeJam problems!

    See you there!

    Ananya Das(Avi)'12
    Roberto Segebre '12
    (CS Club Czars)

  • 25

    Oct

    2011

    Title: Towards a Formal Model of Accountability

    Abstract: Preventive security is not always appropriate or possible, but it can be complemented by deterrence. Related to deterrence is the idea of "accountability," although this term is often used in ill-defined and conflicting ways. We focus on on accountability as a mechanism for ensuring security in information systems. Towards that end, we present a formal definition of accountability in information systems. Our definition is more general and potentially more widely applicable than the accountability notions that have previously appeared in the security literature. In particular, we treat in a unified manner scenarios in which accountability is enforced automatically and those in which enforcement must be mediated by an authority; similarly, our formalism includes scenarios in which the parties who are held accountable can remain anonymous and those in which they must be identified by the authorities to whom they are accountable. Essential elements of our formalism include event traces and utility functions and the use of these to define punishment and related notions. (Joint work with Joan Feigenbaum [Yale] and Rebecca Wright [DIMACS/Rutgers])

  • 18

    Oct

    2011

    You're invited to an information session / chat with department faculty about graduate programs and fellowships. Learn about various opportunities and the application process (including writing a personal statement, asking for letters, etc.), what programs are like and what they expect from you. This tea isn't just for seniors (although the information should be useful, as the earliest fellowship deadlines are coming up in a month) -- learning about these opportunities early in your career can help you decide whether this is an avenue to pursue and can help you better prepare if you're interested. Bring any and all questions, and hope to see you there!

  • 4

    Oct

    2011

    A department chat to discuss aspects of summer internships, including:

    - What the interview process is like
    - Examples of different types of positions that our students have held
    - Differences among companies and teams, such as work environment, expectations, and responsibilities
    - Other general advice!

    Our featured student speakers include:
    - Dharmesh Bhatt (Microsoft)
    - Marius Dragus (Facebook)
    - Dan Pulitano (John Hancock)
    - Gaurav Ragtah (SlideShare)

    As always, refreshments will be served. Since there are a few speakers, lunchfare will be provided by Curtain Call. :-) Come and support your fellow classmates! We hope to see you there!

  • 27

    Sep

    2011

    Agent-Based Modeling of Crowd Behavior in an Evacuation Scenario
    Josh Zukoff '13

    Josh’s research involved the utilization of Agent Based Modeling (ABM) tools to simulate a quasi-realistic evacuation scenario in a built space. The space took the form of a stadium and the model attempted to take into account psychological aspects like group formation and social comparison to accurately represent crowd behavior. Crowd behavior in built spaces is of interest to a number of types of individual’s i.e. urban planners, emergency personnel. Similarly, agent based modeling can adapt itself to the simulation of a vast array of scenarios. Josh’s model was written to take advantage of flocking behavior to simulate grouping behavior. The model illustrates the ability for ABM to approximate crowd behavior using low level decision making processes and flocking behavior. Additionally, various aspects of communication among people can be shown to have an effect on evacuation time.

    Software is available from the Pointers page on the CS department Wiki: http://cs.colgate.edu/cswiki/Pointers

    Acknowledgment: This work was done while participating in the Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program at DIMACS, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, supported by various federal funding agencies including the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Department of Homeland Security.

    Note: Students who might be interested in summer research, especially at other institutions, are encouraged to attend to learn about this type of program.

  • 20

    Sep

    2011

    Please join the COSC department faculty as they informally discuss things like:
    - Doing research in the department such as honors these or summer research
    - Faculty research areas of interest
    - Applying for grad schools or jobs
    - Fellowships and scholarships
    - Internshipts