Contact Information

Computer Science Department
Colgate University
McGregory Hall, 3rd Floor
13 Oak Drive
Hamilton, NY 13346
(tel) 315.228.7719
(fax) 315.228.7009
department@cs.colgate.edu

Upcoming events

  • 21

    Feb

    2017

    Speaker: Christopher King, Class Of 2018

    Abstract: ​​
    Even after decades of vision research, interaction between user and computer hasn't been perfected. But a wave is simple, but that has difficulties in itself. My research aims to understand the difficulty of this problem and develop an environment to test any hypotheses I develop with my mentor, Elodie Fourquet, such as applying known body proportions to intuitively understand the body.
    Using the temporal and spatial coherences in mapping body proportions as specified by Vitruvius, we found that if the human body can be found within certain parameters, not only can we track it, but we can predict where the body went when its out of focus and categorize anyone in frame based on how they vary from the Vitruvian body ratio. Our implementation detects extrema from a moving silhouette based on skin color and motion, and gathers relevant information to build a personal model given the silhouettes in frame.

  • 28

    Feb

    2017

    Come hear about exciting computer-science-related projects that are being developed as part of Colgate's Thought Into Action (TIA) program.

  • 21

    Mar

    2017

    Speaker: Tom Brackett, Professor Emeritus of Computer Science, Colgate University

    Abstract: A look at the case to be made that John Vincent Atanasoff, born in Hamilton, NY in 1903, was indeed the inventor of the digital computer.

    Bio: Tom Brackett is a Professor Emeritus of Computer Science at Colgate. He founded Colgate's Computer Science department in 1971 and was the Director of Computing at Colgate from 1970 to 1975. Before founding the CS department, Tom was a professor in the Chemistry departments at Colgate (1963 to 1971) and Rice University (1957 to 1962). Tom, along with his spouse Elizabeth Brackett, have worked extensively to support the education of Burmese refugees. They founded the Brackett Refugee Education Fund in 1997 and were awarded a Doctor of Humane Letters Honoris Causa by Colgate in 2015.


Past events

  • 14

    Feb

    2017

    Speaker: Lena Olson, Google

    Abstract: Specialized hardware accelerators, including third-party accelerators, can offer system designers high performance and/or low energy. They are increasingly complex and have interesting new abilities, such as sharing a unified memory space with the host system. However, accelerators may contain security vulnerabilities due to design flaws or malicious intent. I will give an overview of some types of threats that may be especially important when considering accelerators. I will then talk about a low-overhead approach to mitigating one particular flaw: incorrect memory accesses to host system memory by the accelerator. We show how accelerators can be forced to respect process memory access permissions as stored in the page table, with a per-accelerator storage overhead of 0.006% the size of physical memory and low (on average, 0.15%) performance overheads.

    Bio: Lena Olson received her PhD in Computer Sciences from University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2016. She was advised by Mark Hill. Her dissertation focused on the security and reliability challenges of hardware accelerators, in particular how third-party accelerators can coherently access shared memory while still maintaining safety and security on the host system. Her other research interests included various ways of improving energy efficiency in CPU caches through predicting block reuse behavior. Lena works in Google's Madison office.

  • 7

    Feb

    2017

    Speaker: Aaron Gember-Jacobson

    Abstract: Our brains receive 11 million bits of information every second, but we can only consciously process 40 bits per second. Thus, the majority of our mental processing is ruled by our unconscious. These unconscious decisions are influenced by our own biases, which can lead us to make decisions that negatively impact our peers, our university, the computer science community, and society.

    Aaron will engage students and faculty in exercises that illustrate unconscious bias, present some of the leading research on unconscious bias, and discuss strategies that are used by some of the leading companies in technology to overcome unconscious bias.

Events history